Research Studies

Research Projects

Studies in support of a new vaccine to prevent invasive Haemophilus influenzae type a (Hia) disease in Canadian Indigenous communities 

Objectives:     

  • To determine target populations for a new Hia vaccine based on collection of seroepidemiological data.
  • To determine Hia colonization rates in communities at high vs low risk of invasive Hia disease, nasopharyngeal swabs will be collected from children using a non-invasive approach, and characterized in the National Microbiology Laboratory using microbiological and molecular-biological methods.
  • To determine serological benchmarks for protection against Hia studies of naturally acquired antibody and their functional activity in populations with high vs low risk of invasive Hia disease will be conducted using immunological methods. Epidemiological data to be collected via retrospective chart review of cases of invasive Hia disease with regards to risk factors associated with this disease, and unfavorable disease outcomes.

Project Lead:
Dr. Marina Ulanova

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Impact of repeated vaccination against influenza on influenza antibody titres and laboratory-confirmed illness        

Objectives:

  •  – To determine the vaccination history (starting in 1990, as possible) of participants of the Influenza Cohort Study, which was conducted in 2010/11-2013/14. This data will be used to compare the pre-season HI titres of participants by influenza type/subtype (A/H1N1, A/H3N2, and B) by influenza vaccination in the current season and vaccination history, adjusting for age, sex, season, and study site.
  •  – To compare the VE against lab-confirmed influenza by vaccination in the current season and vaccination history, adjusting for the participant’s age, sex, season, and study site.
  •  – Responses of up to 5% of consenting participants will be compared with Occupational Health records in sites with available records to assess recall bias.

Project Lead:
Dr. Brenda Coleman

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Is MF59-adjuvanted influenza vaccine (IV) a preferred priming vaccine for naive infants 6 - <24 months of age? A randomized controlled observer blind trial   

Objectives:

The objective is to determine if a priming vaccination schedule of with MF59-adjuvanted seasonal influenza vaccine followed by boosting immunization in the following year with unadjuvanted IV in infants induces superior serum hemagglutination inhibition (HI) antibody titers in year two compared to priming and boosting with unadjuvanted IV. We hypothesize that adjuvanted IV priming will result in higher anti-influenza antibody titers than unadjuvanted vaccine priming, and more robust cell mediated immune responses.

Project Lead:
Dr. Joanne Langley

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Publications

CIRN and PCIRN publications listed on this site are available pending and with the compliance of the access policies of the journal they are published in.